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Posts for tag: High Heels

By Foot Health Centers, LLC
October 09, 2017
Category: Foot Care

For some women, there’s nothing quite as exciting as getting a brand new pair of elegant high heels. High heels come in a number of attractive high heels injurystyles, including pumps, stilettos, wedges, Mary Janes, platforms and sling backs. But those pretty heels can hide some pretty ugly truths. Take a moment to learn more about the hidden dangers of high heels and how they can cause serious problems for your feet.

Heel Spurs

Heel spurs are bumps that form on the heel bone over time due to continuous friction or pressure. The design of many high heeled shoes puts a strain on the back of the foot, leading to complications with heel spurs and irritation of the skin.

Ankle Injury

Women who wear very high heels also put their ankles at risk of injury. If the wearer falls or has a sudden movement in the wrong direction, it could cause a sprained ankle. The higher the heel, the worse the potential effects of a fall.

Hammertoes

One of the most commonly reported problems that podiatrists receive from women who wear high heels is the appearance of hammertoes. A hammertoe develops as the toes are pinched and squeezed forward in the front of the heel—the toes begin to bend at the joints into an unnatural shape. In some cases, the joints are aggravated to the point where the wearer can no longer bend the toes back up.

Corns and Calluses

Hammertoes are often seen in combination with unsightly corns that develop on the tops of the toes due to friction with the shoe. Calluses also often develop on the sides of the feet and on the bottom, where the ball of the feet meets the ground each time you take a step.

As gorgeous as those high heels on the rack may look, it’s also important to think about how your feet could look after a while if you wear them often. If you enjoy wearing high heels, protect your feet by maintaining regular appointments with your podiatrist. A number of modern solutions and foot therapies are available, so if you have any of the symptoms mentioned above, call your podiatrist today to schedule an urgent consultation.

By Foot Health Centers, LLC
October 15, 2013
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Footwear   High Heels  

HeelsWhile high heel shoes may look stylish or complement your favorite outfit, they are rarely the best option for a woman's feet. According to a study by the American Podiatric Medical Association, 39 percent of women wear high heels every day; of the women who wear heels daily, three out of four reported foot problems. Despite the numbers, many women continue to underestimate the health risks associated with high heels.

High heel shoes disrupt the body's alignment, crowd the toes and force the body's weight onto the ball of the foot. Wearing heels can contribute to a variety of foot and ankle problems, including:

  • Achilles tendonitis. The Achilles tendon and calf muscles tighten and shorten as the front of the foot moves down in relation to the heel. This causes stress and painful inflammation of the Achilles tendon.
  • Bunions. Narrow-toed shoes can cause a bony growth on the joint at the base of the big toe. The bunion forces the big toe to slant in toward the other toes, resulting in discomfort, blisters, corns and calluses.
  • Hammertoes. A narrow toe box crowds the smaller toes into a bent, claw-like position at the middle joint.
  • Metatarsalgia. Continued high heel wear can lead to joint pain in the ball of the foot as a result of heels forcing the body's weight to be redistributed.
  • Ankle injuries. Because heels impair balance and increase the risk of falling, ankle sprains and fractures are common.
  • Pump Bump. The rigid back of a pump-style shoe can cause pressure that irritates the heel bone, creating a bony enlargement known as Haglund's deformity.
  • Neuromas. A narrow toe box and high heel can compress and create a thickening of tissue around a nerve between the third and fourth toes, leading to pain and numbness in the toes.

Still not willing to ditch the heels? There are ways to relieve some of the damaging effects of high heels.

  • Avoid heels taller than 2 inches
  • Choose thicker, more stable heels. Thicker heels are still stylish, plus they lessen the stress on your feet and provide better shock absorption.
  • If you must wear heels, wear your gym shoes or flats for commuting and change into your heels once you arrive to your destination.
  • Stretch and massage your calf, heel, and foot muscles. This helps relax the muscles and tendons and prevents them from tightening and shortening.
  • Avoid shoes with pointed toes

High heel shoes can cause pain and foot deformities that can last a lifetime. So the next time you go to slip on your heels for a long day at work or a night out, consider the consequences and rethink your options. If foot pain persists, visit Foot Health Centers, LLC for treatment.