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Posts for tag: Foot Pain

By Foot Health Centers, LLC
September 14, 2018
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Foot Pain   Custom Orthotics  

Custom orthotics are removable shoe inserts that provide greater arch support and stability to the feet and ankles. There are different types of orthotics available depending on the issue and level of support that is needed. Basic orthotics are sold over the counter, but a custom pair designed specifically for your foot will provide optimal support and comfort.

When are Custom Orthotics Necessary?

Podiatrists typically recommend custom orthotics for people with flat feet, or very high arches. One of the most common signs that you may benefit from a pair of orthotics is heel pain (although you may also experience pain and swelling in other parts of the foot). You may also experience pain and swelling after normal and relatively low impact activities like standing or walking.

A good way to figure out if you are having pronation issues is to examine the soles of your shoes and sneakers. If the soles and insoles tend to become visibly more worn on one side, it may be a sign that your alignment is off and you are over or under pronating. A podiatrist may ask you to walk in your bare feet to observe your stride and gait (known as a gait analysis). If you experience persistent pain, swelling, or stiffness, especially after exercise or after long periods of rest, schedule an appointment with a podiatrist.

Types of Custom Orthotics

There are a few different types of custom orthotics designs available depending on your needs.

Functional (also known as rigid) orthotics are made of harder materials and are usually prescribed for pronation problems or joint issues like arthritis.

Accommodative orthotics are designed to provide more cushioning and support and are typically prescribed for problems like plantar fasciitis and bunions.

In addition to improving your gait and foot and ankle alignment, custom orthotics can help to prevent related strains and injuries and relieve back, joint, and knee pain if it is caused by issues with your arches and pronation.

By Foot Health Centers, LLC
March 05, 2018
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Foot Injuries   Foot Pain   Stretching  

Any workout instructor or coach will tell you that you have to stretch your body before participating in strenuous activity, and that is good advice. stretchingHowever, stretching isn’t a cure-­all for all that ails your feet. Here are a few busted stretching myths that you may have been taught in physical education class as a youngster. The full truth can be found by making an appointment to talk to your podiatrist.

Myth 1: Stretching Prevents All Foot Injuries

Stretching regularly reduces the chance of injury to the feet, but it doesn’t prevent injuries from happening altogether. Researchers at the George Institute for Global Health in Sydney found that stretching before physical activity doesn’t really make a difference as to whether an injury will occur. Also, if you think that stretching before a workout will eliminate soreness the next day, that’s also a myth. Stretching just gives you more flexibility and may help reduce the occurrences of serious sprains.

Myth 2: Even Stretching for Just Under a Minute Helps

Many people who stretch before a workout or sports game only do so for a few moments before jumping full­speed into the activity. But studies have shown that stretching for just 30 to 45 seconds is not enough to make a significant effect on the flexibility of muscles and joints in your feet. Stretching longer (at least five to 10 minutes) is a better idea. Some experts suggest that simply easing slowly into the activity may even be more helpful than stretching in some cases.

Myth 3: Stretching Will Heal the Muscles and Joints

Some patients neglect to visit their doctor when they have foot pain because they believe that simple stretching will heal torn or sprained ligaments. Stretching is a way of making your joints and muscles more flexible, but it does not heal them. Additional treatments and therapies are necessary to successfully heal torn, damaged or inflamed body parts.

These myths busted should not discourage you from stretching your feet and other body parts—just know that you shouldn’t think of it as a replacement for professional care and advice from a qualified podiatrist. If you’re an athlete having foot pain or complications, schedule an appointment to discuss the issue with your podiatrist today.

By Foot Health Centers, LLC
October 09, 2017
Category: Foot Care

For some women, there’s nothing quite as exciting as getting a brand new pair of elegant high heels. High heels come in a number of attractive high heels injurystyles, including pumps, stilettos, wedges, Mary Janes, platforms and sling backs. But those pretty heels can hide some pretty ugly truths. Take a moment to learn more about the hidden dangers of high heels and how they can cause serious problems for your feet.

Heel Spurs

Heel spurs are bumps that form on the heel bone over time due to continuous friction or pressure. The design of many high heeled shoes puts a strain on the back of the foot, leading to complications with heel spurs and irritation of the skin.

Ankle Injury

Women who wear very high heels also put their ankles at risk of injury. If the wearer falls or has a sudden movement in the wrong direction, it could cause a sprained ankle. The higher the heel, the worse the potential effects of a fall.

Hammertoes

One of the most commonly reported problems that podiatrists receive from women who wear high heels is the appearance of hammertoes. A hammertoe develops as the toes are pinched and squeezed forward in the front of the heel—the toes begin to bend at the joints into an unnatural shape. In some cases, the joints are aggravated to the point where the wearer can no longer bend the toes back up.

Corns and Calluses

Hammertoes are often seen in combination with unsightly corns that develop on the tops of the toes due to friction with the shoe. Calluses also often develop on the sides of the feet and on the bottom, where the ball of the feet meets the ground each time you take a step.

As gorgeous as those high heels on the rack may look, it’s also important to think about how your feet could look after a while if you wear them often. If you enjoy wearing high heels, protect your feet by maintaining regular appointments with your podiatrist. A number of modern solutions and foot therapies are available, so if you have any of the symptoms mentioned above, call your podiatrist today to schedule an urgent consultation.

By Foot Health Centers, LLC
March 02, 2017
Category: Foot Care
Ouch! Your aching feet! When your feet hurt, your day is interrupted and you may not be able to complete your daily tasks. Most of the time foot painyour pain might be caused by a combination of conditions. Below are 5 possible reasons why your feet might hurt. Let’s take a closer look.

Ill-Fitting Shoes

The number one reason why you might be experiencing foot pain is ill-fitting shoes. As a woman, you might think those platform heels are irresistible, but you should think again. The same goes for unsupportive sandals or clogs that are easy to slip on and off. These shoes may look cute, but they can be doing major damage to your feet—more than you may realize. To better understand the best shoes for your feet, contact your podiatrist for more information. 

Heel Pain (Plantar Fasciitis)

Are you experiencing a stabbing pain when you put weight on your heel? If so, you might be suffering from heel pain, also known as plantar fasciitis. This pain is often worse first thing in the morning or after you have been resting. The cause of your heel pain might include:
  • Obesity
  • Flat feet
  • High-arched feet
  • Overuse
  • Inward roll of your feet when walking
Your podiatrist might recommend replacing your shoes every six months for better support. Other treatment options that might be recommended are:
  • Orthotics
  • Icing your heels
  • Steroid shots
  • Surgery (for severe cases)

Bunions

Bunions can also be a cause of your foot pain that are caused by tight shoes, genetic predisposition or arthritis. Some symptoms include:
  • A bulging bump on the outside of your big or pinky toe
  • Pain at the site of the bunion
  • Trouble moving your big or pinky toe
  • Corns and calluses from overlapping toes
By visiting your podiatrist, a proper treatment plan can be created to minimize your pain.

Osteoporosis

While you may not experience any symptoms in the early stages, over time you might feel generalized foot pain. If you suffer from a lot of pain when you place weight on your foot or your foot swells, bruises and is painful to the touch you might have a fracture. 
 
Osteoporosis occurs when existing bone breaks down faster than the body can create new bone, which can result in thin, brittle bones that easily break and cause you immense amounts of pain. 

Osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis is sometimes referred to as the “wear and tear” arthritis because the wearing down of the protective cartilage that covers the ends of your bones causes it. Your feet are weight bearing, which causes them to take a beating resulting in slow degradation of cartilage between the two points. In the short run, the pain can come and go, but over time it tends to become more constant.
 
Contact your podiatrist if you are experiencing foot pain. By scheduling an appointment, you can get to the bottom of your foot pain.
By Foot Health Centers, LLC
January 03, 2017
Category: Podiatry
Tags: Heel pain   Foot Pain   Yoga   Ankle Pain   Stretching  

Foot pain can range from your toes to your heel. When it comes to heel pain, also known as Plantar Fasciitis, affects 60% of individuals in yoga foot caretheir lifetime. When the thick tissue on the bottom of your foot called the Plantar Fascia becomes inflamed, it can become a daily annoyance. But you still need to stay fit. So what's the solution?

Yoga is a low-intensity, simple and impactful workout. Not only does it help you stay fit when your heel pain prevents you from following your regular execrise regimen, but stretching and low-impact exercise, both of which yoga covers, can help ease your pain. Tight calf muscles often make Plantar Fasciitis worse, and yoga can help stretch and loosen them.

Remember, any pose in yoga should only be performed to the extent that you feel comfortable - pain is not gain! Go at your own pace and react to your own flexibility, making adjustments as you go.

Mountain Pose:  This is a great pose to start with, especially if you aren't very familiar with yoga, as it forms the basis for many other poses and helps get you acclimated.

  1. Stand with your feet together and your arms at your sides. Try to distribute your weight as evenly as possible across all parts of the foot, from the toes to the heel to the arch.
  2. Straighten your legs without locking your knees. Lift your arches.
  3. Engage the muscles in your thighs, turning them inward slightly. Try to lengthen through the base of your spine and tailbone without curving your back.
  4. Press your shoulder blades back and down to open the chest. Allow your arms to hang loose. 
  5. Try to balance as evenly in the pose as possible, breathing deeply. Feeling the distribution of weight in your feet, do your best to keep your weight even at all four corners of the foot, to keep your head lifted with your chin parallel to the floor, and remain as even and symmetrical in weight and posture as possible.

Downward Dog Pose: The pose many people think of when they think of yoga. While this pose doesn't require a yoga mat, performing it on a non-slippery surface is helpful, because you will need to put weight into the feet, and they may slide back if you try it on a hard floor.

  1. While sitting on the floor, move onto all fours, placing your hands down firmly on the floor slightly ahead of your shoulders, palm and fingers spread. Keep your knees directly in line with your pelvis.
  2. Breathe out and lift your knees from the floor, tucking your toes under and standing on the balls of your feet falling back almost as if you will sit on your heels. Keep your hands firmly on the floor.
  3. Then push up with your legs, allowing your heels to fall back toward the floor, pushing your pelvis into the air, hands still on the ground, forming an inverted v-shape with your body.
  4. Keep your head between your arms rather than letting it hang loose toward the floor. Try to distribute your weight between feet and hands, to avoid putting too much weight on either the ankles or the wrists. Drop your shoulder blades 
  5. Try to press your chest toward your legs as much as is comfortable. You can also try to press your heels into the floor, again, only as much as is comfortable. Try to rotate your arms so your elbows face toward your thumbs and rotate your thighs inward, as in mountain pose, to engage the quads.
  6. Your hands should be shoulder-width apart, your feet hip-width apart and hands and feet should be parallel to each other. Your toes should point straight ahead. Take deep, long breaths and stretch into the pose as much as you feel comfortable doing. 
  7. Breathe into the pose. When you want to release the pose, perform a reverse of how you pressed yourself up - bend your knees in, then move back to hands and knees.

Chair Pose:  Chair pose offers a great stretch. As a pose that involved standing on both feet, one of the great things about it is that you can do it anywhere - even at the office!

  1. Start in Mountain Pose.
  2. Raise your arms over your head. Do not bend your elbows.
  3. Bend your knees and gently push your pelvis down as if you are sitting into an invisible chair behind you. Try to make your thighs as parallel as possible to the floor without losing your balance.
  4. Keep your lower back lengthened, not allowing it to curve into the pose, maintaining a straight back. Try to also shift as much weight as possible into your heels. Look straight ahead.
  5. Sink as deep into the pose as you feel comfortable, then try to hold it, again breathing deeply through the nose.
  6. To release, exhale and straighten the knees, coming back to Mountain.

Yoga offers a heel-pain friendly way to get in a workout, and may even help ease your pain. For other foot and ankle pain remedies and treatments, contact your podiatrist today!