Metairie, LA Podiatrist
Foot Health Centers, LLC
1521 N Causeway Blvd
Suite A

Metairie, LA 70001

(504) 833-0029

La Place, LA Podiatrist
429 W Airline Highway
La Place, LA 70068

 

 

By Foot Health Centers, LLC
September 15, 2014
Category: Foot Care

Athletic ShoesNo matter what sport you play, the type of shoe you wear while playing your favorite game is one of your most important pieces of equipment.  Choosing the most appropriate, supportive athletic shoes for your specific sport and foot structure can make a huge difference in keeping your feet healthy and comfortable while improving your performance.  Serious back, knee, hip and heel pain; Achilles tendonitis; fractures; and painful blisters are some of the common conditions faced by athletes wearing the wrong footwear.  

From soccer and tennis to golf and basketball, the structure of your foot and any abnormalities should be considered when selecting a proper shoe for your activity.  Look for a shoe that combines flexibility, support and cushioning to absorb impact and lessen shock on the feet.   Before selecting an athletic shoe, it is always recommended to consult Foot Health Centers, LLC for a professional evaluation of your foot type, any underlying deformities and helpful shoe buying tips.

Types of Shoes

There are unique variations in the way different athletic shoes support your feet.  This means that it’s not good to play football in the same shoes you use for jogging. Your feet require different support for different activities and movement.

A good sports shoe should be fitted to support the foot in position that is most natural to the movement required.  For instance, a running shoe is designed to accommodate high impact while a shoe built for tennis or basketball provides a combination of flexibility and sideways support.

Out with the Old

Like most things, your athletic shoes will wear out after a period of time. An old, worn out shoe is a common cause of sport-related injuries.  If you run, track your mileage to determine when your shoes have endured too much activity, and when you notice obvious wearing of the soles or you sense a lack of cushioning from the shoes, it may be time to buy a new pair.

Remember, the best pair of athletic footwear doesn’t have to be expensive to support the needs of your feet and body during a workout.  There are numerous shoes available that will fit both your needs and your budget. When you’re feet are protected by the right footwear, you can reduce the likelihood of injury.  Visit our Metairie office for an evaluation and shoe recommendations.

 

By Foot Health Centers, LLC
September 05, 2014
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Foot Stretches  

Foot StretchesThe feet bear a lot of stress from day to day.  That’s why podiatrists recommend stretching as a great way to revitalize and strengthen the feet.  Simple stretches can be performed at home as a part of your morning routine or even at work while you’re sitting at your desk. Improving your flexibility through stretching can help prevent foot injury, increase your mobility, improve performance and posture, and relieve stress.

It is especially important to stretch properly before starting any exercise routine. When muscles are warmed up prior to a workout, the strain on muscles, tendons and joints can be reduced and injuries avoided.  

Simple stretches include flexing your feet repeatedly while pointing your toes to help build strength in the foot muscles, or rotating your foot from side to side while you point your toes. Massaging the muscles in your feet with your hands is another helpful way to promote circulation and relaxation.

Always allow at least 5-10 minutes to fully stretch your muscles, which should include a stretch/hold/relax pattern, without any pulling or bouncing.  Before beginning any new type of stretches, visit Foot Health Centers, LLC first to make sure it’s safe for your particular foot pain. Here are just a few helpful stretches you can do at home to help lessen foot pain and improve foot health:

  • Stretch for Calf Muscles.  Excessive tightness of the calf muscle can cause many foot problems. To stretch this muscle, face a wall from approximately 2-3 feet away. Lean into the wall, keeping heels on the floor and knees extended. Hold for 10 seconds as the calf muscle stretches, then relax. Do not bounce. Repeat five times.
  • Stretch for Hamstring. Put your foot with knee straight on a chair or table. Keep the other leg on the floor straight with knee locked. Lower your head toward the knee on the chair or table until the muscles are tight. Hold to a count of 10 then relax. Repeat five times, and then switch to the other leg.
  • ·Stretch for Plantar Fascia. This stretch for heel pain can be performed in the seated position. Cross your affected foot over the knee of your other leg. Grasp the toes of your painful foot and slowly pull them toward you. The fascia should feel like a tight band along the bottom of your foot when stretched. Hold the stretch for 10 seconds. Repeat it 20 times for each foot. This exercise is most effective when you first wake up, before standing or walking.

Stretching in combination with supportive footwear will help you keep your feet healthy and fit. So whether you’re gearing up to train for a marathon or simply looking to revitalize your feet after a long day at work, talk to your podiatrist at Foot Health Centers, LLC about the best foot stretches for your individual needs.

By Foot Health Centers, LLC
August 19, 2014
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Stress Fractures  

Stress FracturesStress fractures are notoriously misdiagnosed and under treated. In many cases, symptoms may persist for an extended period of time before the diagnosis of a stress fracture is even made. That’s because stress fractures don’t typically occur from an unforeseen trauma, as with a sprain, but rather from repetitive stress.

Stress fractures are tiny, hairline breaks in the bones. They can occur in any bone, but most often afflict the weight-bearing bones of the lower leg and foot. Athletes are especially susceptible to stress fractures, as this common injury is often a problem of overuse.  It frequently results from overtraining and high impact sports, such as running, basketball and tennis.  People with abnormal foot structure or insufficient bone may also be more vulnerable to suffer a stress fracture.

Pain is the primary symptom of a stress fracture. In the early stages, the pain may begin toward the end of an activity and resolve with rest. Untreated, the pain will eventually become persistent with minimal activity.

The most common symptoms of stress fractures include:

  • Pain with or following normal activity
  • Pain at the site of the fracture
  • Tenderness and swelling at a point on the bone
  • Pain intensified with weight bearing

Rest, ice, compression and elevation are recommended as an initial treatment plan for stress fractures. You should also minimize all weight bearing activities until you have fully recovered. Other treatments may include immobilization of the foot, footwear modifications, orthotic devices and in some severe cases, surgery. Rest is the key to a full recovery, and returning too quickly to normal activity may result in more serious damage.

Overuse injuries and stress fractures aren’t completely unavoidable, but you can take extra care to help prevent stress fractures from occurring. Remember to increase any activity or training program slowly and gradually.  Wear supportive footwear with good cushioning to help manage the forces placed on your feet and legs during high impact activities.   If pain or swelling returns, stop the activity and rest for a few days.

Stress fractures come on gradually and may not present obvious symptoms at first, so it’s important to recognize the early warning signs to prevent further damage.  If you suspect a stress fracture, contact our Metairie office right away for an evaluation. Proper diagnosis is essential to prevent further damage and improve recovery time as stress fractures tend to get worse and may even lead to a complete break if not treated right away. A podiatrist will examine your foot or ankle, take an x-ray to determine if there is a break or crack in the bone, and recommend an appropriate treatment plan for optimal recovery.

By Foot Health Centers, LLC
August 11, 2014
Category: Foot Care

Healthy Feet for Active Kids

The feet of children grow and change rapidly during their first year, reaching almost half their adult foot size. Many changes in children’s feet are a natural part of development while others require attention and treatment from a professional. That’s why it’s important for parents to pay close attention to their child’s feet to ensure proper growth during every stage of development.  Foot Health Centers, LLC provides expert care, diagnosis and treatment of ankle and foot disorders for children.

Here are some tips to help parents guide normal development for their child’s feet:

  • For babies, avoid covering the feet too tightly as this restricts movement and can delay normal development.
  • If your child participates in sports, choose sport-specific shoes that fit his or her feet properly
  • Observe walking patterns. Does the child toe in or out; have bowlegs or knock-knees; limp or experience other gait abnormalities? These problems can be corrected if they are detected early.
  • A child’s feet size changes rapidly, so check your child's shoe size often. Shoes should be supportive, well-cushioned and roomy.
  • When applying sunscreen, remember to apply to the feet.
  • Kids love the freedom of being shoeless, but walking barefoot may increase a child’s risk of infection, sprains or fractures.


Remember, your child doesn’t necessarily have to show signs of foot pain or discomfort for something to be abnormal.  A child’s feet are very pliable and can be deformed without the child recognizing the warning signs.  Carefully monitor your child’s feet. If you notice unusual symptoms, seek professional care immediately. Deformities will not be outgrown by themselves.  

Your child will depend on his or her feet for the rest of their life to get them where they need to go. Whenever you have questions about your child's foot health, contact Foot Health Centers, LLC.  Any pain that lasts more than a few days, or that is severe enough to limit the child’s walking, should be evaluated by a professional.

By Foot Health Centers, LLC
August 07, 2014
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Marathon Training  

marathon runningWhether you’re training for your very first marathon or preparing for your tenth, it’s important to begin your training program on the right foot.  A lack of experience coupled with the repetitive impact placed on the feet and ankles during a long run can produce enough stress to cause hairline fractures and other debilitating foot injuries.

Many foot problems seen in marathoners are caused by the repetitive pounding over the months of long-distance running. In some people injury is triggered by the abnormal foot biomechanics and in others it is because of poor training. During a 10-mile run, the feet make about 15,000 strikes, at a force of three to four times the body's weight. Even if you have perfect foot mechanics, injuries and pain are often unavoidable with this amount of stress.  

To prevent injury during training, it’s important to pay close attention to your feet.  When increasing mileage, avoid doing so too quickly. The increased forced can make your feet more susceptible to stress fractures.

Basic tips for training include:

  • Follow a training schedule that is appropriate for your experience level
  • Start easy and increase your mileage slowly
  • Stretch and warm up properly to reduce strain on muscles, tendons and joints
  • Choose appropriate footwear based on your foot structure, function, body type, running environment and training regimen
  • Never ignore pain. If the pain gets worse with reduced exercise and rest, stop training and visit your podiatrist

Aside from stress fractures which often occur from overtraining, additional foot problems you may experience include:

  • Toenail problems, including ingrown and fungus
  • Heel pain, such as plantar fasciitis
  • Achilles tendon and calf pain
  • Toe pain, such as bunions
  • Shin splints

Before you start training, Foot Health Centers, LLC recommends visiting a podiatrist for a complete evaluation of your lower extremities.  Our Metairie office will examine your feet and identify potential problems, discuss training tactics, prescribe an orthotic device that fits into a running shoe (if needed), and recommend the best style of footwear for your feet to allow for injury free training all the way up to your race day. It is especially important to come in for an exam if you have already started training and are experiencing foot or ankle pain.  

Training for a marathon is hard work. It takes time and dedication.  At Foot Health Centers, LLC, we offer special interest and expertise working with marathoners to ensure good foot health throughout your entire training program to help you achieve your goals.





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