Metairie - 1521 N Causeway Blvd Suite A Metairie, LA 70001
LaPlace - 429 W Airline Highway La Place, LA 70068
Covington - 50 Louis Prima Dr. Covington, LA 70433

My Blog
By Foot Health Centers, LLC
September 18, 2017
Category: Foot Care
Tags: plantar warts   Warts  

Find out what you can do to prevent plantar warts from happening to you.

There seem to be a multitude of old wives’ tales that tout interesting and sometimes funny ways to remove warts. However, instead of finding unique ways to get rid of your warts, it’s even better if you can prevent them from happening in the first place. While it can be difficult to avoid the virus that causes plantar warts, there are some measures you can take to try to prevent yourself from coming in contact with this common virus.

What causes plantar warts?

Plantar warts are caused by a virus known as the human papillomavirus (HPV). While these warts are benign, they can be unsightly, uncomfortable and embarrassing. There are several different strains of HPV responsible for producing plantar warts, growths often found on the soles of the feet. However, some people that have HPV may not even develop warts.

How can you prevent exposure to the HPV virus that causes plantar warts?

While it’s difficult to ever be 100 percent protected against getting plantar warts, the best way to not get them is by avoiding contact with HPV. This means not touching warts that either you or someone else may have. Some other tips include:

  • Don’t share towels, shoes or razors with anyone. Remember, someone can still have HPV and not show any visible signs.
  • Always wear shoes in damp, warm and moist areas where the virus may thrive. This includes wearing shoes while using public locker rooms, pools or public showers.
  • Prevent irritation on the bottoms of your feet by wearing the proper shoes. Feet that have broken skin are more susceptible to developing warts.
  • Always dry your feet, particularly after sweating. Wear absorbent socks if you find that your feet sweat frequently.

While plantar warts can be unsightly, they aren’t dangerous. However, if you want to have one removed, talk to your podiatrist about at-­home treatments or come into our office to have it removed professionally.

How are plantar warts treated?

There are some over­the­counter salicylic acid treatments that are effective and safe for removing warts. There are also over­the­counter cryotherapy kits that freeze off these growths. However, these kits are only safe to use on warts that develop on your hands or feet.

If you aren’t sure whether you have warts or if you have been diagnosed with diabetes and you’re dealing with plantar warts, then it’s important to seek the medical advice of your podiatrist. Call us today!

By Foot Health Centers, LLC
September 08, 2017

The metatarsal area is one of the most common sites for stress fractures. This article discusses the causes and treatments for these fractures.Metatarsal Stress Fractures

Stress fractures anywhere on the body are caused by repeated forceful activity. Considering that the feet bear a person's body weight for much of the day, they are very susceptible to stress fractures. The long bones in the feet, the metatarsals, are particularly prone to these injuries. But how are they diagnosed, treated and prevented?

Why metatarsal stress fractures happen

Certain activities or conditions can make stress fracturing the metatarsal bones more likely. Athletes who run, dance, or jump are at risk, as are those who suddenly boost their activity level after a long period of idleness. Osteoporosis (a disorder that causes weakness and brittleness of the bones) can also increase the likelihood of stress fractures.

Diagnosis and treatment

Widespread foot pain is usually the first sign of a metatarsal stress fracture. It may disappear with rest at first, but over time, the pain will be continual and concentrated into a specific area of the foot. Because stress fractures can be extremely small, an x-ray may not immediately detect it. Bone scans or MRIs are often more accurate. Special footwear can take the pressure off of the affected area and allow the fracture to heal. Depending on the location of the fracture, a cast may be applied and crutches may be required.

Prevention

Properly-fitted, quality footwear should always be worn during activity to support the feet. Alternating your activities (instead of focusing on one particular, repetitive action) will help to distribute the movements evenly. Diets rich in calcium and Vitamin D will help maintain bone integrity. It is also important to start any new physical activity slowly and work up at a gradual pace.

If you have been experiencing foot pain and believe it may be caused by a metatarsal stress fracture, contact your podiatrist for an evaluation today.

By Foot Health Centers, LLC
August 14, 2017
Category: Foot Care

Discover the telltale signs of a foot infection and what you can do to prevent diabetic­related foot problems.diabetic foot infection

If you’ve been diagnosed with diabetes, you likely know all too well there is a significant chance you may deal with a foot complication. While foot problems for healthy individuals often go away on their own, when you have diabetes maintaining good foot health is vitally important. Since diabetics are at an increased risk for lower limb amputation, it’s important to check your feet everyday for signs of infection. Here are some common foot problems you may face:

Athlete’s foot: This fungal infection is characterized by itching, cracked, and red skin on the foot. While there are some over­the­counter treatments, if you have diabetes and are currently dealing with Athlete’s foot, we recommend talking to your podiatrist first. Your podiatrist may prescribe a stronger antifungal pill or cream to fight the infection.

Fungal nail infection: If you are suffering from brittle, discolored nails that are fragile and tend to crumble, then you may have a fungal infection. These nail infections are more difficult to treat, so talk to your podiatrist about whether oral medication or laser treatment is recommended.

Calluses/Corns: These are both the result of hard skin build up, with calluses developing on the bottoms of feet and corns developing on or between toes. These may develop from wearing shoes that rub against your skin. Sometimes using a corn pad can help cushion and protect the callus or corn from further damage while also promoting faster healing. However, talk to your podiatrist about certain medications that can help soften this condition.

Blisters: Just as friction from rubbing shoes can cause calluses and corns, they can also cause painful blisters. These blisters can become infected, and it’s important to leave blisters alone and not to pop them. Use an antibacterial gel or cream to help prevent infection and to protect the damaged skin.

Ulcers: These deep sores in the skin can easily become infected if not cared for properly. Poorly fitted shoes and even minor scrapes can cause ulcers to form. The sooner you seek treatment, the better your outcome. Talk to your podiatrist about the best treatment options for diabetic­related foot ulcers.

Ingrown toenails: An ingrown toenail is when the edge of the nail grows or cuts into the skin, causing pain, swelling, and irritation. If you trim your toenails too short, or you crowd your toes into tight shoes, you are more likely to develop this problem.

How do you prevent these foot problems in those with diabetes?

The best thing you can do is seek medical attention and treatment for your diabetes. If your condition is under control, then you’re less likely to deal with these complications. Be sure to also practice good hygiene when it comes to cleaning and drying off your feet. Also, examine your feet each day to check for any changes or problems that may need additional care. Always trim toenails straight across and do not round the nail; doing this will prevent ingrown toenails.

If you are experiencing any of these symptoms then it’s time to see your podiatrist right away for treatment. The sooner you seek treatment the better the prognosis. Don’t put off your foot health.

By Foot Health Centers, LLC
August 04, 2017
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Runners   Marathons  

How Marathons Affect Your Feet.Find out how marathons impact feet and what you can do to maintain good foot health.

Marathons are a great way to stay active and fit while also enjoying the rush of the competition. For some, marathons are a lifestyle that they just can’t live without. The adrenaline and endorphins from completing another marathon can leave you hungry for more; however, while you’re enjoying the afterglow of yet another completed marathon, it’s important to consider your feet!

While we often don’t think of our feet until there is a problem, it’s important to protect them during marathon training and competitions to ensure that they stay healthy and happy. Let’s learn about the effect marathons can have on your feet, and what you can do to protect them.

Common Foot Problems of Marathon Runners

While marathoners tend to be healthier than the rest of the population, there are some precautions that should be taken to ensure that the athlete staves off the common injuries that can occur over those strenuous miles. 

Do you know just how much a marathon knocks your feet around? On average, a runner will land about 13,000­20,000 times on each foot with their whole weight. That’s certainly a lot of force and pressure that your feet have to deal with. Therefore, don’t be surprised if you experience any of these common issues:

  • Blisters
  • Calluses
  • Corns
  • Toenail injuries

While these conditions are more common and rarely warrant a trip to your podiatrist’s office, there are some other more serious foot conditions that marathoners need to be aware of:

  • Plantar fasciitis
  • Achilles tendinitis
  • Stress fractures
  • Ankle strains and sprains

Foot Problem Prevention

The key to preventing marathon­related foot injuries is to always choose the proper shoes. This means finding high­impact shoes that can give you the ample support your foot needs to do its job properly. Go to a sporting goods shoe store, where the employees will have some expertise in which shoes would work best for your athletic needs. Here are some good rules when it comes to your marathon shoes:

  • Never purchase shoes that are too loose or too tight. While you want room for your toes to move around, you don’t want the shoes rubbing against parts of your feet.
  • Opt for orthotics to provide additional support and comfort while pounding the pavement.
  • Always throw out old shoes, as they won’t provide you with the proper support and cushioning you need. While it’s up for debate when you should replace your shoes, most runners tend to toss their old pair after about 300 to 400 miles.

Pain is your body’s way of telling you that something isn’t right. While some foot pain can easily go away on its own with rest, some conditions are more serious and require your podiatrist’s attention. If your symptoms become severe or don’t go away after a couple days, it’s might be time to schedule an appointment with us.

By Foot Health Centers, LLC
August 02, 2017
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Ski Boots  

Ski BootsConsider the health of your feet the when you purchase your next pair of ski boots.

It’s time to grab those skis and hit the trails! Perhaps you’ve finally decided to take that weekend trip and go skiing with the family, but before you leave, you need to purchase a new pair of ski boots. Before you grab the first pair of boots that you see, it’s important to consider your feet and ankles. Your podiatrist offers up foot care tips for skiers and snow bunnies alike.

Why Do I Need Proper Ski Boots?

While this might seem like a silly question, you would be surprised how many athletes and skiers don’t really consider their foot and ankle health when it comes time to purchase shoes. However, your feet and ankles absorb shock and act as brakes, able to turn and steer in a different direction at a moment’s notice. This is a lot of wear and tear on your feet, and if you’ve ever had a pre­existing foot injury, you are even more prone to damage.

You can reduce your chances of injury just by buying proper skiing gear. Ski boots are, by far, the most important piece of equipment you’ll own as a skier. Here are some things you should know before purchasing your next pair of ski boots:

  • Your ski boots should fit snugly. If the boots are too loose, they will slide around, placing pressure and strain on different areas of the foot.
  • If you have found it difficult to turn while skiing, this may be due to an imbalance in the structure of your foot. If this is the case, talk to your podiatrist about custom­made orthotics that can be inserted into your ski boots to provide additional support and stability.
  • It’s generally a good idea to buy or rent your skis from someone who knows about ski boots, like a winter sports retail specialist. If you already have orthotics that you wear when you ski, you’ll want to bring those in—along with the socks you’ll wear on the slopes—when you are trying on a new pair of ski boots.
  • Try on a variety of different ski boots and walk around the store in them to see how they fit. Remember that you’ll probably be wearing these boots for several hours a day, so they must fit you perfectly.
  • If you’re an avid skier, then talk to your podiatrist about special orthotics that can be used to protect your feet from constant wear and tear that will happen when you’re on the slopes for hours a day, multiple days a week.

The more time you spend calculating how your foot health plays into the equation the safer your feet will be when it comes time to hit the slopes. Enjoy a fantastic ski weekend without worrying about foot injuries!





This website includes materials that are protected by copyright, or other proprietary rights. Transmission or reproduction of protected items beyond that allowed by fair use, as defined in the copyright laws, requires the written permission of the copyright owners.